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Welcome ... Akwaaba....

Africa's contributions to world civilization, the development of Europe and the Americas are often downplayed, sometimes even ignored. There is no denying that we have come a long way from the time when scholars asserted that Africa had no history. It has certainly been a very difficult and painful journey through pre-colonial times, slavery, colonialism, the cold war and neo-colonialism. In our time, structural adjustment, militarism, and civil wars have taken their toll on the continent. In spite of these, Africa continues to move forward, albeit slowly and gradually, into the 21st century. Militarism has given way to democracy (even if it is sometimes propelled forward by western pressures and IMF conditionalities). What needs to happen is democratization, promotion of literacy and technological development, good governance, respect for majority and minority rights, respect for human rights, state institutions, and job creation programmes to ensure a higher lower cost of living. Therein lies the recipe for further development.

This site is dedicated to these goals through the study and dissemination of information about Africa, a critical analyses of Africa's problems and an in-depth analysis of possible solutions. All are welcome to participate in the debate/ discussion/ discourse.

One love.

Edmund Abaka.

Contact: Dr. Edmund Abaka
Office Phone: (305) 284-3702
Fax: (305) 284-3558
Address: Ashe 625F, Department of History
  University of Miami,
P.O. Box 248107, Coral Gables, Florida 33124-4662
E-mail eabaka@mail.as.miami.edu
Office Hours: Tue & Thurs 2-3, or by appointment

The International Conference on The Role of the African Youth on the Continent and in the Diaspora in the 21st Century This conference took place at York University from May 26-28, 2000. It was the 12th Annual All-African Students' conference, and was held under the auspices of the African Studies Program, Founders College, York University.

Development of Western Civilization I.This is a lecture and readings course beginning with the evolution of the human species and paying attention to the origins of civilized life in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Crete, Greece and Rome.

Development of Western Civilization - II. This lecture and readings course is designed to assist students in understanding the major political, economic, and social events which have shaped European society since the Reformation.

West African History 1000- 1960 - 400 Level Seminar.This course examines some of the major themes in West African History from 1000 to 1970 - state formation and growth of the Sudanese and Forest Kingdom & Empires.

Slavery & Emancipation.This course analyses the history of slavery and emancipation in Africa and the Americas from the late 16th century to early 20th century.

History of Africa II (Since 1800). This course deals with the emergence of modern Africa from about 1800 until the present.

Themes in Modern African History. The course assumes no prior background in African history, but it requires that students master the historiography of several Saharan societies and to analyze historical debates.

Islam, Christianity and Traditional Religion in African History. The course will introduce students to the interplay between Arab, European, and African ideas, institutions and cultural practices.

Nelson Mandela: The Man, The Movement, and The Legacy.  This course will examine the life, work and legacy of this remarkable man, Nelson Mandela, the freedom fighter, the prisoner, and the President...

History of Africa I (To 1800), Pre-Colonial African History (Survey Course). This course is designed to give students a general understanding of history of pre-colonial Africa....

This site is maintained by Adhiemurti
Last maintained: August 7, 2000