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Development of Western Civilization I.

Development of Western Civilization - II.

West African History 1000- 1960 - 400 Level Seminar.

Slavery & Emancipation.
History of Africa II (Since 1800).
Themes in Modern African History.
Islam, Christianity and Traditional Religion in African History.
Nelson Mandela: The Man, The Movement, and The Legacy.
History of Africa I (To 1800), Pre-Colonial African History (Survey Course).


 

Summer  I, 2000

Dr. Edmund Abaka
Department of History; Tel: (305) 284-3702
e-mail: eabaka@mail.as.miami.edu

MTWRF (8:30a.m. -9:55 a.m)

Office Hours:  Mondays and Wednesdays 11:40 a.m. -12:40 p.m.
(or by appointment - I will be on campus everyday)

COURSE DESCRIPTION     

This is a lecture and readings course beginning with the evolution of the human species and paying attention to the origins of civilized life in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Crete, Greece, and Rome.  The accomplishments of the Egyptians will be dealt with more fully than is usual in a survey of this kind.  The reason for this  will become apparent as the semester unfolds.  Following the decline of the Roman Empire in the fifth century, we will examine the emergence of Feudalism culminating in the beginnings of European civilization.  The major monotheistic religions that emerged in this time period - Judaism, Christianity, and Islam - will receive the attention they deserve.

At appropriate junctures, we will look at the role of archaeology and some of the 19th and 20th century   archaeologists, linguists, and historians, who brought the accomplishments and wonders of the ancient world to light.  They include Jean-François Champollion, Sir Henry Rawlinson, Howard Carter, Lord Carnavon, Heinrich  Schliemann, Sir Arthur Evans, Michael Ventris, and others.

 

The lectures should be supplemented with information from the assigned textbooks.

Success in this course depends to a large extent upon the following:

1.     A lively curiosity about what happened in the past  

2.     Regular class attendance and careful note-taking

3.     Conscientious reading of the text and the assigned chapters.

REQUIRED BOOKS

Textbook:            Greaves, Zaller, and Roberts,

                        Western Civilizations, vol 1 (New York: Longman)

                        McKay , Hill and Butler

                        A History of Western Society  vol. I

Essays:            William Hughes (ed.), Western Civilization. Vol. 1

 

IMPORTANT DATES:

First Day of Class…………………………………….Wednesday, May 17

Last Day to drop a class without a “W”……………….Tuesday, May 23

Memorial Day Holiday………………………………..Monday, May 29

Mid-Term Examination………………………………Wednesday, June 7

Term  Paper……………………………………………Monday, June 12

Classes end……………………………………………..Wednesday June 23

Reading day……………………………………………..Thursday, June 24

Final Examination ……………………………………Friday, June 23 ( MM 215)

 

CLASS PROCEDURES

Prior to each lecture a list of IDs will be put on the blackboard, or projected onto a screen.  These serve as an outline of the upcoming lecture and also as a guide for review purposes.

Students are well-advised to begin each class by copying the ID’s.

ATTENDANCE POLICY

In a survey course as broad as this one, attendance is important.  A missed lecture can cost you a half century, a century, or more of history.  Should you be unable to attend a lecture for good reason, find someone in class who will allow you to copy his/her notes.  If, after doing this, you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact me for help.

Attendance will be taken at the beginning of each class.  Consistent absences can result in a student being deleted from the class roll.

U.M. HONOR CODE

All students in History 131 are expected to abide by the University of Miami Honor Code.  Copies of the Code are available from the offices of the College of Arts and Sciences on the second floor of the Ashe Administration Building.

GRADING

First exam                               30%
Term Paper                             20%
Project                                     10%
Final exam                               40%

EXAMINATION FORMAT

In order to receive a grade in this course a student must take the two examinations and hand in a paper.  The examinations will take the following format:

Part I - Essay: This will be a general question relating to what you have learned so far from the lectures and the reading.  Students should use their best English prose style.  Write complete sentences and do not list or abbreviate.

Part II: Historical Paragraphs: Students will select two out of three questions to be answered in an informative paragraph.  Experience has shown that a good paragraph requires at least three-quarters of a page in the Examination Bluebook.

FINAL EXAM

The final exam covers the entire course, but with an emphasis upon material covered since the first exam.

TOPICS

The course will cover the following topics:

1.     History and Human Beginnings

Greaves, Zaller and Roberts, Civilizations of the West. pp. 1-6

McKay , Hill and Butler, A History of Western Society. pp. 3-6

 

2.     Agriculture and Social Developments in the Neolithic Age

Greaves, Zaller and Roberts, Civilizations of the West. pp. 7-11

McKay , Hill and Butler, A History of Western Society. pp. 6-10

 

3.     The Advent of “Civilization

Greaves, Zaller and Roberts, Civilizations of the West. pp. 11-13

Hughes, Western Civilization vol 1. “ The Earliest Civilizations” pp. 4-5

           

4.     Mesopotamia - Sumer, Akkad, Babylon, Assyria

Greaves, Zaller and Roberts, Civilizations of the West. pp. 15-22

McKay , Hill and Butler, A History of Western Society. pp. 10-20; 47-58

Hughes, Western Civilization vol 1. “Grisly Assyrian Record,” pp. 21-23; 24-27.

 

5.     Egypt

Greaves, Zaller and Roberts, Civilizations of the West. pp. 23-26

 McKay , Hill and Butler, A History of Western Society. pp. 20-40

Hughes, Western Civilization vol 1 “Hatshepsut”; “ Lost Tomb” pp. 6-15;

 

6. Greece

Greaves, Zaller and Roberts, Civilizations of the West. pp. 44-60; 70-96

McKay , Hill and Butler, A History of Western Society. pp. 3-6; 62-101; 104-130

Hughes, Western Civilization vol 1 “Classical Tradition”; “Games for Boys and

Girls”; “Martial Republics”; “Athenian Democracy”; “Herodutus” pp. 28-47; 52-87

 

7.     Athens

Greaves, Zaller and Roberts, Civilizations of the West. pp. 60-68

Hughes, Western Civilization vol 1 pp. 48-51.

 

8.     Rome

Greaves, Zaller and Roberts, Civilizations of the West. pp. 97-122; 149-173

McKay, Hill and Butler, A History of Western Society. pp. 134-200

Hughes, Western Civilization vol 1 “Democrary”; “Friends & Romans”pp. 73-

 

9.     The Roman Empire and Christianity

Greaves, Zaller and Roberts, Civilizations of the West. pp. 123-148

McKay , Hill and Butler, A History of Western Society. pp. 200-216

Hughes, Western Civilization vol 1, “Judeo-Christian Heritage”; “Women and the

Bible”; “Feminism?”; pp. 88-119.

 

10. Feudalism and the beginnings of European civilization

Greaves, Zaller and Roberts, Civilizations of the West. pp. 174-294

McKay , Hill and Butler, A History of Western Society. pp. 242 ff.

Hughes, Western Civilization vol 1 pp. 169-173

 

11. Islam and Judaism

 Greaves, Zaller and Roberts, Civilizations of the West. pp. 181-205

McKay , Hill and Butler, A History of Western Society. pp. 230-237

Hughes, Western Civilization vol 1 “Moslems & Byzantines”; “World of Islam”;

 

TERM  PAPERS (4-5 pages)

*May be preceded by short presentations 5-10 minutes each.

No late papers will be accepted.

1.     The contribution of Islam to the development of Western Civilization

2.     Judaism and Western Civilization

3.     The development of agriculture as an economic activity

4.     Humankind and the environment in ancient times

5.     Technological developments of the ancient period.

6.     Women in the Ancient Near East

7.     Women in Egypt

8.     Women in Greece and Rome

9.     The Origin and Development of the Olympic Games to the 5th Century

10. Leisure in Greece and Rome

11. The Epic of Gilgamesh

12. Sports in Ancient Greece

13. Athenian Democracy

14. Impact of Alexander the Great on Egypt or Alexander and the Hellenic World

15. Tiglath Pilesser III

16. The Significance of Rivers in the Development of the Ancient Near East

17.  Hannibal and Rome

18. Religion in Ancient Egypt

19. The Code of Hammurabi and its relevance to the development of the Legal System of the Ancient Near East

20. Slavery in Greece

21. Slavery in Rome

22. The Akkadians

23. Carthage, Phoenicia and Trade in the Mediterranean region

24. The Pyramids of Egypt

25. Babylon

26. Constantine and the Rise of Christianity

27. Paul and Christianity

28. Solon

29. Minoan Civilization

30. The Sphinx of Egypt

31. The Punic Wars

32. Alcohol in the Ancient Near East

33. Greek Religion

* Use no less than three books excluding the required text. Use the internet as well but remember that downloading information without crediting the "source" amounts to plagiarism.

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